RHEL/CentOS, Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu & FreeBSD Comparison

Over the years I’ve used a number of Linux distributions (and FreeBSD), these are my top 5 and how I rank them:

centos_debian_fedora_ubuntu_freebsd_score

Desktop

Gnome ScreenshotI’m not a big fan of Ubuntu’s Unity, so Ubuntu-Gnome, Kubuntu, Debian and Fedora are my top distros for desktop choices.  If you want the latest Gnome features Fedora gets them first.  For KDE I think Kubuntu does a great job at reasonable default settings (like say, having the Start button open the KDE menu, why is it KDE programmers think that shouldn’t be default behavior?) where I have to do quite a bit more tweaking on other distros.  Ubuntu-Gnome also provides an optional PPA which tracks the latest version of Gnome bringing it almost as up to date as Fedora is.

Ugly fonts – for some reason, on FreeBSD, Fedora, CentOS, and Debian the fonts look ugly… I don’t know if they can’t detect my video card properly or if there’s something wrong with the fonts themselves but on every system I’ve tried the fonts look much better on Ubuntu based distributions.

If you’re interested in FreeBSD for a desktop PC-BSD is worth a look, but in my experience Linux runs a lot better on the desktop than FreeBSD.

Server

FreeBSD is historically my favorite server OS, but they tend to lag behind on some things and I have trouble getting some software working on it so for the most part I use Ubuntu for servers as it seems to have the best out of the box setup.  90% of the time I’m deploying in virtual environments and open-vm-tools is now enabled by default in 16.04.

With perhaps the exception of Fedora all the distros make decent servers.

Packages

All the package management systems are pretty decent, I do prefer apt just because I never have any problems with it and it’s faster.  Debian and Ubuntu have the most packages available, and Ubuntu has PPA support which makes it easy to manage 3rd party repositories.

One thing I don’t like about Debian, while it does have a lot of packages is a lot of packages are out of date.  A few months ago I tried to install Redmine from the repository and even though the repository had it at version 3.0 the actual version that was installed was 2.6.  Someone needs to do some clean up.

CentOS hardly offers any packages so you have to enable the EPEL just to make it functional and even then it’s limited.   My main issue with CentOS is it seems if you want to do anything other than a very basic install you’re dealing with not finding packages (like rdiff-backup, why isn’t that in the repos?) or needing packages from conflicting repositories and sometimes having to download them manually.  It’s a nightmare.

One other thing I like about apt is the philosophy of Debian and Ubuntu of setting up some sensible default configurations and enabling the service.  After installing packages on Fedora, CentOS, or FreeBSD I’m often left manually creating configuration files.  CentOS is the most annoying–maybe it’s just me but if I install a service I want SELinux to not block me from running that service… and when I make a change in SELinux it should take effect immediately instead of arbitrarily taking a few minutes to come to it’s senses.

Free Software

Richard Stallman
By – Thesupermat – CC BY-SA 3.0

While Richard Stallman wouldn’t endorse any of the distributions I’m comparing, if he had to choose from these Debian would likely be his choice.

Debian LogoAll the OSes include or provide ways of obtaining non-free software, but Debian is at the forefront of making it a goal to move to Free Software.  Fortunately I think they do this in a smart way where they’re still including ways to install non-free drivers so you can at least make a system usable.  I think Debian does the best job of making it clear what’s free and what isn’t, and allowing the user to make the choice.

 

Evilness

RedHat LogoI used to be a big RedHat fan back in the RH 6 and 7 days.  Then one day my loyalty was rewarded when out of the blue RedHat decided to start charging for updates for their “Free” OS… RedHat’s new free alternative was Fedora which was so unstable it was unusable.  I was suddenly going to need to buy lots of licenses… this left me scrambling for a solution and I eventually switched over to Ubuntu.  Since then I’m wary about anything related to RedHat.  CentOS is now the free version of RedHat while Fedora is where all the new features are available and it’s not so unstable these days.  And, yes, RedHat, I’m still bitter.

Ubuntu introduced Amazon ad supported searches and even worse was by default sending search keywords from the unity lens to Canonical.  I’d consider this an invasion of privacy and really the first time I started looking for Ubuntu alternatives after I switched from RedHat.   Fortunately the feature was easy to disable, and now Ubuntu has since disabled it.

Out of Box Hardware Support

Dell XPS 13 with UbuntuUbuntu has the best out of box hardware support.  Dell’s XPS 13 even comes in a developer edition that ships with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.  It works outUbuntu Logo of the box on just about every laptop I’ve tried it on.  Also it was the first distro to support VMware’s VMXNET3 and SCSI Paravirtual driver in the default install and now I believe it’s the only distro that has open-vm-tools pre-installed.  All this cuts down on the amount of time and effort it takes to deploy.

I wish Debian did better here.  Debian excludes some non-free drivers which is good for the FSF philosophy but it’s also means I had no WiFi on a fresh Debian install.  Apparently you’re supposed to download the drivers separately.  This is particularly bad when your laptop doesn’t have an Ethernet port so you have no way to download the WiFi drivers.  I suppose I could have re-installed Ubuntu then downloaded the Debian, WiFi drivers, save them off to a USB drive, re-install Debian and side-load the WiFi drivers… but what a hassle.

Automatic Security Updates

Ubuntu and Debian give the option of enabling automatic security updates at install time.  The other systems have ways of enabling automatic updates but there isn’t an option to enable it by default at install time.  My opinion is all operating systems should automatically install security updates by default.

Init System

FreeBSD DaemonFreeBSD avoids the nonsense for the win here.  I do not like systemd.  I’d rather spend time not fighting systemd.  Maybe I can figure it out someday.  Why didn’t we all switch to upstart?  I liked upstart.

Cutting Edge vs Stability

Fedora LinuxFor cutting edge Fedora or Ubuntu standard (every 6 month) releases keep you up to date, great for wanting to stay cutting edge on a Desktop Environment.

FreeBSD is the most stable OS I’ve ever used.  If I was told I was building a solution that would still be around in 30 years I’d probably choose FreeBSD.  Changes to the base system are rare and well thought out.  If you wrote a program or script on FreeBSD 10 years ago it would probably still work today on the latest version.   In the Linux world I like Debian stable or Ubuntu’s LTS (after the first point release) and CentOS (aslo after the first point release) are great options.

Ubuntu provides the best of both worlds getting cutting edge with LTS releases which I find very beneficial for having a stable environment but still having relevant development tools and up to date server environments.  If you need something newer you have PPAs, but most of the time the standard packages are new enough.  Right now for example Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the only distribution that ships with a version of OpenSSL and NGINX that supports an http/2 implementation that works with Google Chrome.  To top if off both OpenSSL and NGINX packages fall under Ubuntu’s 5-year support.  You don’t have to add 3rd party repos, solve dependency issues.  Just one command: “apt install nginx” and you’re good for 5-years.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the only distro that supports http/2

(above screenshot from: https://www.nginx.com/blog/supporting-http2-google-chrome-users/)

Upgrading

FreeBSD LogoFreeBSD is the best OS I’ve ever used at upgrading to a newer release.  You could probably start at FreeBSD 4, and upgrade all the way to 11 and have no issues.  Debian and Ubuntu also have pretty good upgrade support… in all cases I test upgrading before doing it on a production system.

Long Term Support (LTS)

CentOS LogoCentOS has the longest support offering at 10-years!  Combined with the EPEL repository (which also has the same goal) I’d say RedHat/CentOS is the best distribution for a “deploy and forget” application that gets thrown in /opt if you don’t want to worry about changes or upgrades breaking the app for the next 10-years.  This is probably why enterprise applications like this distribution.

Debian is just starting a 5-year LTS program through a volunteer effort.  I’m looking forward to seeing how this goes.  I’m glad to see this change as lack of LTS was one of the main reasons I decided on Ubuntu over Debian.

Ubuntu offers 5-year LTS.  Ubuntu’s LTS not only covers the base system but also the Ubuntu team supports many packages (use “apt-cache show packagename”) and if you see 5y you’re good.

Predictable Release Cadence

release-chart-desktop

Ubuntu has the most predictable release cadence.  They release every 6 months with a 5-year LTS release every 2-years.  Having been a sysadmin and a developer I like knowing exactly how long systems are supported.  I plan out development, deployments, and upgrades years in advance based on Ubuntu’s release cadence.

My Thoughts

When I was younger it was fun to build my entire system from scratch using Gentoo and compile FreeBSD packages from ports (I also compiled the kernel).  Linux wasn’t as easy back then.  I remember just trying to get my scroll wheel working in RedHat 7.

Screenshot of how to get the scroll wheel working
I found this old note.  I finally got the scroll wheel working in RedHat 7.1!

Linux distributions are tools.  At some point you have to stop trying to build the perfect hammer and start using it to put nails in things.

Now days I don’t have time to compile from scratch, solve RPM dependency issues, or find out why packages aren’t the right version.  In the year 2000 I could understand having to fix ugly font issues and messing around with wifi-drivers.  But we should be beyond that now.  That was the past.

Calvin and Hobbes Comic Strip
By Bill Waterson, 1995-08-27, Fair Use – 17 U.S.C. § 107

Onward

Ben wearing RedHat
I used to wear the official RedHat Fedora

Fonts, automatic updates, scroll wheel, touchpad, bluetooth, wifi, printers, and hardware in general should be working out of the box by now–if it isn’t I’m not going to put a lot of effort into getting the distro working.  It’s time to move forward and focus work on things beyond the distribution–while I love all sorts of distros, I don’t want to be like Calvin fighting the computer the whole way.  I actually do work on them and need something stable and up to date out of the box with sane default settings.  Having predictable release cycles also helps.  If I could combine the philosophy of Debian with the few extras that Ubuntu provides I’d have the perfect distro.  But for the time being Ubuntu is close enough to what I want–I’ve been using it probably since 5.04 (Hoary Hedgehog) and standardized on it when they started doing LTS releases.  That doesn’t mean it’s for everyone, not everyone likes it, some people prefer the more vanilla feel from Debian, others might want something easier like Mint.  If you prefer CentOS, Fedora, Arch, etc. and they work well for you, use them.

Actually I don’t use Ubuntu for everything.  For my production environment I’ve standardized on Windows 10 for desktops, ESXi for virtualization, FreeNAS for storage, pfSense for firewalls, and Ubuntu for servers.  Honestly, none of the above systems were my first choice… but I’m at where I am because my first choices let me down.  It will likely evolve in the future, but for the time being that’s my setup and it works pretty well.

The great thing about modern day Linux distributions (and FreeBSD) is they’re all pretty good.  I haven’t had to hack an Xorg file to get the scroll wheel working in a long time.

 

 

Journey to Facebook

Week 1:

Number of Friends: 6.  (That’s probably enough)
Number of Likes: 0.
Species: Kind of like the Borg.

Defender (Star Trek USS Enterprise) of Freedom vs Facebook (Borg ship)

I see my home, b3n.org, getting further into the distance.  My blog is in one of the most beautiful locations nestled in the mountains between the Tech and Conservative Blogs, definitely more on the Tech side and well away from the Bay of Flame.  I can see the tech blogging area I’m most familiar with getting smaller and smaller.  A few minutes later I see Lifehacker passing by and I’m flying over the Sea of Opinions.   And then it hit me.   I’ve left the Blogosphere.

After a long flight I stop for a layover at Reddit, then I was back in the air and landed just north of Data Mines, Facebook.  And I joined Facebook.  The reason for my travel?  I’m looking for information locked away in a closed Facebook group.

That was last week.

Map of Social Networks showing my travel from the Blogosphere to Facebook

Most of my friends left the Blogosphere for MySpace, and then moved further north to Facebook years ago (and I’ve re-united with six of them so far).   My impression of Facebook so far: It’s like a bunch of mindless drones all talking at once–well, let me start over.  It’s like a bunch of ads all talking at once and mindless drones trying to shout above them.

Facebook is a land I’ve always avoided–It’s basically what AOL or Geocities should have become–a step back from freedom and individuality.

It’s Not Social Networking That’s the Problem

When you join Facebook, you have to abide by their rules and subject yourself to their censorship.  If you disagree with Facebook, you either comply or you’re out.  There’s no alternative.

Websites, Blogging, and Email on the other hand are based on what the internet should be–open protocols.  If I run my own email server I can send an email to anybody else no-matter what provider they use!  This blog is run on a server I control.  Currently it’s rented from DigitalOcean because I no longer have the bandwidth at my house to run it, but in the past I’ve run it from my dorm room, my bedroom closet, from right under my desk, and from Jeff’s house.  And the thing is anybody can setup their own server–but they don’t have to.  They can use a provider like Blogger or Gmail if they prefer–but if you can get better service somewhere else you can migrate to different provider at will and not lose anything.

But Facebook isn’t open and federated.  Facebook users can only talk to other Facebook users and as long as you want to talk to your Facebook friends the only way is to be on Facebook yourself.  The content is all stored on their servers so you are at their mercy for control and privacy of your content.  Or is it your content?  On Facebook, you are not your own individual, or your own community.  You are part of the Borg.

I’m not against social networking, but Facebook is designed in a very centralized manner which isn’t consistent with how the internet services should be–more distributed and federated.  Some social networks I might be more interested in are Friendica and Diaspora but I don’t think they have much traction yet.

One More Thing

One particularly concerning thing about Facebook is you don’t pay for it–which means, that you’re not Facebook’s customer.  No, indeed.  You, my liked Friend, are the product being sold.

 

Automatic Ripping Machine | Headless | Blu-Ray/DVD/CD

The A.R.M. (Automatic Ripping Machine) detects the insertion of an optical disc, identifies the type of media and autonomously performs the appropriate action:

  • DVD / Blu-ray -> Rip with MakeMKV and Transcode with Handbrake
  • Audio CD -> Rip and Encode to FLAC and Tag the files if possible.
  • Data Disc -> Make an ISO backup

It’s completely headless and fully automatic requiring no interaction or manual input to complete it’s tasks (other than inserting the disk).  Once it completes a rip it ejects the disc for you and you can pop in another one.

Flowchart of Ripping Process

I uploaded the scripts to GitHub under the MIT license.  Instructions to get it installed on Ubuntu 14.04 or 16.04 LTS follows.

Automatic Ripping Machine (Supermicro MicroServer) under my desk

ARM Setup & Equipment

Blu-Ray Hardware and VMware Settings

The ARM is an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS VM running under a VMware server.  At first I tried using an external USB Blu-Ray drive but the VM didn’t seem to be able to get direct access to it.  My server case has a slim-DVD slot on it so I purchased the Panasonic UJ160 Blu-Ray Player Drive  ($45) because it was one of the cheaper Blu-Ray drives.

I wasn’t sure if VMware would recognize the Blu-Ray functions on the drive but it does!  Once physically installed edit the VM properties so that it uses the host device as the CD/DVD drive and then select the optical drive.

VMware Machine Properties, select CD/DVD drive, set Device Type to Host Device and select the optical drive.

Regions…

I kept getting this error while trying to rip a movie:

MSG:3031,0,1,”Drive BD-ROM NECVMWar VMware IDE CDR10 1.00 has RPC protection that can not be bypassed. Change drive region or update drive firmware from http://tdb.rpc1.org. Errors likely to follow.”,”Drive %1 has RPC protection that can not be bypassed. Change drive region or update drive firmware from http://tdb.rpc1.org. Errors likely to follow.”,”BD-ROM NECVMWar VMware IDE CDR10 1.00″

Defective By Design Logo

After doing a little research I found out DVD and Blu-Ray players have region codes that only allow them to play movies in the region they were intended–by default the Panosonic drive shipped with a region code set to 0.

World Map with DVD Region Codes
CC BY-SA 3.0 from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD_region_code#/media/File:DVD-Regions_with_key-2.svg

Notice that North America is not 0.

Looking at http://tdb.rpc1.org/ it looks like it is possible to flash some drives so that they can play videos in all region codes.  Fortunately before I got too far down the flash the drive path I discovered you can simply change the region code!  Since I’m only playing North American movies I set the region code to 1 using:

You can only change this setting 4 or 5 times then it gets stuck so if you’re apt to watch movies from multiple regions you’ll want to look at getting a drive that you can flash the firmware.

Install Ubuntu Packages

Installing MakeMKV

Download and install MakeMKV.  The below is based on the directions here: http://www.makemkv.com/forum2/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=224 (I did not do the optional libavcodec).

Install HandBrake CLI

Install ABCDE CD Ripper

Mount Samba/CIFS Media Share

If you’re ripping to the local machine skip this section, if you’re ripping to a NAS like I am do something like this…

In FreeNAS I created a media folder on my data share at \zfs\data\media

Edit /etc/fstab

Once that’s in the file mount the folder and create an ARM and an ARM/raw folder.

Install ARM Scripts

Create a folder to install the Automatic Ripping Scripts.  Since I hard-coded the location to be /opt/arm in the scripts I suggest putting them in /opt/arm.

Figure out how to restart udev, or reboot the VM (make sure your media folder gets mounted on reboot).  You should be set.

Automatic Ripping Machine Usage

  1. Insert Disc.
  2. Wait until the A.R.M. ejects the disc.
  3. Repeat

Test out a movie, audio cd, and data cd and make sure it’s working as expected.  Check the ouput log at /opt/arm/log and also syslog if you run into any issues.

Install MakeMKV License

MakeMKV will run on a trial basis for 30 days.  Once it expires you’ll need to purchase a key or while it’s in BETA you can get a free key…  I would love to build this solution on 100% free open source software but MakeMKV saves so much time and is more reliable compared to anything else I’ve tried.  I will most likely purchase a license when it’s out of beta.

Grab the latest license key from: http://www.makemkv.com/forum2/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1053

Edit the /root/.MakeMKV/settings.conf  and add a line:

How it Works?

When UDEV detects a disc insert/eject as defined by /lib/udev/rules.d/51-automedia.rules it runs the wrapper which in turn runs /opt/arm/identify.sh which identifies the type of media inserted and then calls the appropriate scripts.  (if you ever need it this is a great command get get info on a disk):

Video Discs (Blu-Ray/DVD)

All tracks get ripped using MakeMKV and placed in the /mnt/media/ARM/raw folder as soon as ripping is complete the disk ejects and transcoding starts with HandBrakeCli transcoding every track into /mnt/media/ARM/timestamp_discname.  You don’t have to wait for transcoding to complete, you can immediately insert the next disk to get it started.

FileBot Screenshot Selecting files for rename

There is some video file renaming that needs to be done by hand.  The ARM will name the folder using the disc title, but this isn’t always accurate.  For a Season of TV shows I’ll name them using FileBot and then move them to one of the Movie or TV folders that my Emby Server looks at.  Fortunately this manual part of the process can be done at any time, it won’t hold up ripping more media.  The Emby Server then downloads artwork and metadata for the videos.

Screenshot of Emby's Movies Page

Audio CDs

If an audio track is detected it is ripped to a FLAC file using the abcde ripper.  I opted for the FLAC format because it’s lossless, well supported, and is un-proprietary.  If you’d prefer a different format ABCDE can be configured to rip to MP3, AAC, OGG, whatever you want.  I have it dropping the audio files in the same location as the video files but I could probably just move it directly to the music folder where Emby is looking.

emby_beethovens_last_night

Data Disks (Software, Pictures, etc.)

If the data type is ISO9660 then a script is run to make a backup ISO image of the disc.

Screenshot of TurboTax ISO file

Morality of Ripping

Two Evils: Piracy vs. DRM

I am for neither Piracy or DRM.  Where I stand morally is I make sure we own every CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray that we rip using the ARM.

I don’t advocate piracy.  It is immoral for people to make copies of movies and audio they don’t own.  On the other hand there is a difference between Piracy and copying for fair use which publisher’s don’t like and the two get wrongly lumped together.

What really frustrates me is DRM.  It’s waste of time.  I shouldn’t have to mess with region codes, and have to use software like MakeMKV to decrypt a movie that I bought! And unfortunately the copy-protection methods in place do nothing to stop piracy and everything to hinder legitimate customers.

Well, hope you enjoy the ARM.

War Games DVD in Tray

 

Gridcoin Mining for Science

GridcoinA cryptocurrency that’s actually productive!  I came across Gridcoin (Ticker: GRC) the other day.

Gridcoin helps with cancer and malaria research as well as studying astronomy and solving math problems.

BOINC LogoIt caught my eye because Bitcoins and most cryptocurrencies require miners to spend a lot of computing power mining hashes that aren’t really useful.  Some argue that this is wasting gigawatts of energy each day.  Gridcoin mining actually pays miners to do useful computing by teaming up with BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing).  BOINC is a way for people to donate the idle time on their computer for various research or grid computing projects.  Gridcoin uses a DPOR (Distributed Proof of Research) mechanism to reward miners by paying out Gridcoin based on the work they do on approved BOINC projects.

Asteriod

Miners can choose to work on a variety of projects.  Solving math problems ranging from computing primes to cracking Enigma messages; researching cures for diseases like cancer and malaria and simulating protein folding; astronomy projects researching asteroids, searching for pulsar stars, mapping the milky way; and various other projects like monitoring wildlife.

Unlike Bitcoin which require specialized ASICS to mine efficiently, because there are a variety of BOINC projects they will most likely be better for general purpose computing hardware.  Some projects are better suited for CPU, some for AMD GPUs, some for NVIDIA, Android devices, etc.  You pick the projects based on the type of hardware you already have.

GRCWithTextOnBottomI don’t see Gridcoin as being very profitable (monetarily) for miners-however, this is a fantastic idea and I hope we see more projects that reward miners for doing actual useful computing!

If you want to get started mining Gridcoin start out by following the directions on the Gridcoin.co Pool.

I’ve been mining for three weeks with a VM (given 8 vCPUs) with the Xeon D-1540 and so far have around 430 coins.  With the current exchange that’s $2.67.  Enough to buy two cheeseburgers.

GRC: SDBycsHrreXXhFAm1nZiYa7SGobBzkVbSH

visual

 

Immigration into the United States

Idaho has been having some issues with immigration lately, my thoughts:

Immigration is a good thing.  It would be un-American to discriminate against any person based on his religion, national origin, ethnic group, operating system preference, etc.. We should be welcoming to all people with good character who are willing to become Americans. That is, as Theodore Roosevelt said:

Picture of President Theodore Roosevelt
President Theodore Roosevelt

In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person’s becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American…There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn’t an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag… We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language… and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people.

Mexico Flag flown in Spokane

We should not abandon prudence when bringing in immigrants, but judge each person based on their character.  There are those who are flying non-U.S. flags, committing crimes, breaking laws, disrespectful, not seeking employment, not trying to learn English, not willing to take up arms to defend America, these should not have entered U.S. soil in the first place.

I, for one, welcome immigrants from any birthplace who have good character and work diligently and are willing to take an oath to defend this country.  But we, in the United States, are clearly lacking in our ability to judge incoming immigrants and refugees and need to address that first.

Once we’re able to distinguish between those with good intentions and those who have no business entering the U.S., we need a better plan to integrate them into society.  The current plan doesn’t seem to be working out so well.  Locating a bunch of refugees together into ghettos isn’t helpful–I don’t see how this will not result in another class of government dependent people and also resentment from Americans because of their lack of assimilation.  Let them integrate into the rest of America and learn our language and culture, give them jobs.

Let them become Americans.

 

Why I Still Prefer Paper Statements

Paper vs Online Statements

I suppose sending the actual statement as an attachment in an email isn’t an option?  If security is a concern encrypt it to my PGP key.

FreeNAS Mini XL, 8 bay Mini-ITX NAS

Catching up on email, I saw a Newsletter from iX Systems announcing the FreeNAS Mini XL (the irony).  On the new FreeNAS Mini page it looks just like the FreeNAS mini but taller to accommodate 8-bays.

Available on Amazon starting at $1,500 with no drives.

Here’s the Quick Start Guide and Data Sheet.

The pictures show what appears to be equipped with the Asrock C2750d4i motherboard which has an 8-core Atom / Avoton processor.  With the upcoming FreeNAS 9.10 (based on FreeBSD 10) it should be able to run the bhyve hypervisor as well (at least from CLI, might have to wait until FreeNAS 10 for a bhyve GUI) meaning a nice all-in-one hypervisor with ZFS without the need for VT-d.   This may end up being a great successor to the HP Microserver for those wanting to upgrade with a little more capacity.

The case is the Ablecom CS-T80 so I imagine we’ll start seeing it from Supermicro soon as well.  According to Ablecom it has 8 hotswap bays plus 2 x 2.5″ internal bays and still managed to have room for a slim DVD/Blu-Ray drive.

ablecom_cs_t80It’s really great to see an 8-bay Mini-ITX NAS case that’s nicer than the existing options out there.  I hope the FreeNAS Mini XL will have an option for a more powerful motherboard even if it means having to use up the PCI-E slot with an HBA–I’m not really a fan of the Marvell SATA controllers on that board, and of course a Xeon-D would be nice.