Merry Christmas 2017

Merry Christmas!

Christmas Trees

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not any thing made that was made. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came as a witness, to bear witness about the light, that all might believe through him. He was not the light, but came to bear witness about the light.

The true light, which gives light to everyone, was coming into the world. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, yet the world did not know him. He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him. But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.

And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth. (John bore witness about him, and cried out, “This was he of whom I said, ‘He who comes after me ranks before me, because he was before me.’”) For from his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. No one has ever seen God; the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known.

— John 1:1-18 ESV

500th Reformation Day

 

Happy 500th Reformation Day!  The Reformation did not begin with Luther.  Rather it can be traced back as far as 1200 A.D. with Peter Waldo (who was forced to live in hiding), then John Wycliff (labeled a heretic), and John Hus (who was burned at the stake).  All these men realized the Roman Catholic Church teachings were contrary to Scripture, and worked to put Scripture in the hands of common people… which Rome feared would undermine their influence and authority.

After Darkness.  Light.

Gutenberg Press Replica: CC BY SA: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Aodhdubh

500 years ago Martin Luther posted the Disputation on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences, also known as the 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenberg Castle.  Although Luther intended to debate these issues and wanted to reform the already divided Catholic Church, it resulted in the Protestant split from Rome.  Thanks to new technology, the Guternberg press, Luther’s writings were widely distributed.  Although I wouldn’t agree with much of Luther’s ideas, I would agree with him on the main issue of the Reformation about how men can be justified before God.  The Roman Catholic Church erred by teaching that justification is by faith plus doing good works.  That is, that salvation and standing before God is not entirely dependent on God’s work, but by God’s work plus our works.  As a result of that unbiblical teaching you get many of the other issues surrounding the reformation (such as indulgences), but the central theme is how man can be saved.  Luther taught from his understanding of scripture that salvation is by faith alone.  There is no good work a sinful man can do to be saved, but rather it is God who saves man by His grace.  There is nothing one can do to improve their standing with God.  Even the best of our good works are tainted in sin, worthless to God.

Rather, our salvation relies on Christ who died on the cross to take the penalty for our sins, and by faith, believing in that work that Christ did, sinful people can be justified before a holy and righteous God.   The glory for our salvation does not belong to us even partly; but solely to God.

For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast.  Ephesians 2:8-9 ESV

Reformation Resources

Sola Fide, by Faith alone.
Sola Scriptura, by Scripture alone.
Solus Christus, through Christ alone.
Sola Gratia, by grace alone.
Soli Deo Gloria, glory to God alone.

Jack-O-Lantern

And of course, Happy Halloween: here’s Eli’s third Jack-O-Lantern:

Pumpkin

Jack O Lantern

Ben’s Laptop Buying Guide

Can you recommend a laptop?  It’s one of the questions I’m asked several times a month…  and I realized I should just write a guide.  So here are some options I think are great and things I think you need to consider before buying a laptop:

Business Vs. Consumer Laptops

Most brands have at least two laptop lines.  Consumer class and business class.  Consumer class laptops are generally junk.  Support is usually bad.  Safety isn’t a priority (some consumer laptops have been known to catch fire), generally manufacturers experiment with new features on their consumer lines, consumer laptops sometimes ship with malware, or lots of junk or trial software.  They’re not as rugged, the left hinge will break after a year or two.  Parts are hard to come by so you can’t fix them.  The Wifi cards aren’t Intel so can’t connect to every Wireless network.  Don’t buy them.  Stick with the business class laptops.  It is usually better to buy an old used or refurbished business class laptop than a newer model consumer class.

Marketing is notorious for making things confusing.  It’s not obvious what’s business class and what’s consumer quality.  Here’s the translation for you (I’ve bolded what I believe are the better quality more rugged products):

  • Dell Business Product Lines
    • Latitude = Business / Enterprise
      • 3xxx = budget business laptops, not that great a quality
      • 5xxx = Workhorse
      • 6xxx = I call this the bulky line, but high quality (discontinued)
      • 7xxx = premium ultrabooks
    • Precision = Business Powerful Workstations, High Performance CPUs and GPUs
    • XPS = Premium Consumer line.  They sort of sit between the consumer and business lines.  Great quality, price, and specs but not as rugged as the Latitudes or Precision
  • Dell Consumer Product Lines
    • Inspiron = Consumer Line
    • Alienware = Consumer Gaming Laptops
    • Chromebook = More like netbooks that run ChromeOS instead of Linux or Windows… unless all you need is a browser stay away from these.
  • Lenovo Business Product Lines
    • Thinkpad = Business / Enterprise
      • X = Thin & Light Ultrabooks
      • T = Flagship, thinner than P but more powerful than X.  Best keyboards are found on the T series.
      • P = Powerful Workstations, High Performance CPUs and GPUs (formerly W).
      • E = Small Business laptops –budget, not very good
      • L = Affordable, not as good as T but a step up from E.
      • Yoga = Tablet / laptop convertibles (not as rugged)
      • 13 = 13 inch chromebook or netbook (not as rugged)
      • 11e = 11 inch educational notebooks (not really business class)
      • A = Same as T series but with an AMD processor
    • Lenovo Consumer Product Lines
      • Yoga (not to be confused with “ThinkPad Yoga)
      • IdeaPad = Consumer stuff
      • Lenovo = Consumer
      • Legion = Consumer Gaming laptops
      • Chromebooks = Chromebook or netbooks
      • Yoga Books = tablet type things

I have included Dell XPS and Apple Macbooks for comparison, they tend to be well built machines but I wouldn’t consider them business class.  They’re more in the “prosumer” class.  I generally don’t recommend them but they may be good options if you you’re not moving them around a lot.  If you want OSX Macbooks are obviously going to be the best bet even though you’re not going to get the ruggedness you’d get with a Latitude or ThinkPad.  If you’re going to run Windows or Linux I’d recommend a Latitude or ThinkPad.

Deciphering Model Numbers:

  • Dell Latitudes:
    • 2nd digit after the first number indicates screen size.  The “4” in “7480” indicates a 14 inch screen.
    • 3rd digit indicates the generation, almost matching up with the year.  The 8 in 7480 = 2018 model year (Latitude is off by a year).
  • Lenovo ThinkPads:
    • T470, the first 4 indicates the screen size, 7 is roughly the model year.  Not sure what the last digit means.  Sometimes a model number has a suffix, e.g. T470s or T470p which may differentiate it further (P = powerful, S = slim)

Recommended New Laptops

12.5 inch

Latitude 7280 – Quality Ultra Portal laptop, thin and light.  Rugged and likely to survive a drop from a few feet.  2.8 LBS.

Latitude 7280

ThinkPad X270 – Ultra Portable Laptop.  Great little notebook, runs a little on the thick side (easier to grip) but the advantage is memory isn’t soldered on and has room for a 2.5 inch drive bay.  Has two batteries (internal and external so you can swap the external without powering down) which can go up to 25 hours.  This is by far the most modular 12.5 inch laptop.

ThinkPad X270

Latitude 5280 – Slightly thicker heavier version of the 7280.

Latitude 5280

Macbook – 12 inch Macbook ultra portable.

Macbook 12 inch

(in the 12.5 inch category these screens are small, so 1366 x 768 is okay if you need little larger text, otherwise upgrade to 1920 x 1080)

Used / refurbished options include anything in the Latitude 72xx, Thinkpad x2xx series.  X220 and earlier have classic keyboards which many consider superior.

13.3 Inch ultrabook

Latitude 7380 – Almost no bezel so it’s the same size as most 12 inch laptops, business version of the very popular Dell XPS, the Latitude version adds a little more durability so I would opt for the Latitude 7380 over the XPS 13.

Dell Latitude 7380

Dell XPS 13

XPX 13 – This Dell is the “prosumer” version of the above, it’s high quality but not as durable.  I don’t think it would hold up to being dropped as well as the 7380, but it’s still a good laptop.  WARNING: Some XPS machines don’t ship with Intel branded wireless cards.  Make sure it’s Intel.

 

Macbook ProMacbook Pro 13 – Great laptop, newer ones have an annoying touchbar instead of function keys so watch out for that (unless you want it for some reason).

Used / refurbished options include older gen Dell XPS or a Latitude 7370.  13.3 is a fairly new category so you probably won’t find too many used laptops with this scrern size.

14 Inch Ultrabook (thin and light)

ThinkPad X1 Carbon (5th Gen).  A 14 inch screen in the size of a 12 or 13 inch laptop.  Very sleek, thin and narrow bezel and quite sturdy.  Lightweight, thin, it’s one of the best ultrabooks on the market.  Memory cannot be upgraded or replaced so order it with what you need.

ThinkPad X1 Carbon

Latitude 7480 – Great high quality business laptop.  Memory is upgradable.  With this latest model E-port snap in docking support has been dropped so if you want docking you’ll need a USB-C dock.

Dell Latitude 7480

ThinkPad T470s.  Thicker than the X1 carbon but thinner than a T470.  Still supports snap-in docking and memory can be upgraded.  The chassis is slightly less rigid than on the T470 or X1.  Also one ram slot is soldered on so won’t be upgradable (2nd ram slot is normal)

ThinkPad T470s

 

Used/refurbished options:  Older generation Thinkpad X1, Latitude 74xx, and ThinkPad T4xxs.

14 Inch Workhorse, All purpose laptop

ThinkPad T470 – This is one of the best all around laptops.  It’s not too thin that it’s hard to grip, but thin enough to not be bulky.  Fantastic keyboard, probably the best on the market.  Two batteries, one internal and one external so the external can be swapped out without losing power.  With a 6-cell battery (which will cause a bulge) it can get 20 hours battery life, or opt for a 3-cell that’s flush with the laptop.  For longevity this laptop is the most modular model in the ThinkPad lineup as far as swapping parts so you should be able to make it last longer if anything breaks.  No GPU options for buyers in the U.S.

.ThinkPad T470

ThinkPad T470p – Quad Core for heavy CPU and an NVIDIA 940MX GPU making it one of the most powerful notebooks in the 14 inch category.  Oddly it does not have a USB-C port.

Latitude 5480 – A little thicker than the 7480, Can be configured with Nvidia 930MX GPU.  Latest generation drops the E-docking port.  I use an older version of this laptop at work, the E5470, and at home I use a E5450 with NVIDIA.  Both have been great computers, and the E-Dock (which is now discontinued) is very robust.  Can be configured with quad core processors.

Dell Latitude 5480

ThinkPad T25 Retro – 25th Anniversary Limited edition.  Essentially a high end T470 with an NVIDIA 940MX GPU… and a classic 7-row keyboard.  This is the best keyboard available on any laptop made today.  I believe this is the only ThinkPad on a T470 chassis to have both a GPU and USB-C port.  Unfortunately it’s on the pricey side

ThinkPad T25 Retro

Used/refurbished options are the ThinkPad T4xx and ThinkPad T4xxp, Dell E64xx, Dell E54xx, Dell 54xx.

15.6 Inch “ultrabook”

ThinkPad P51s – thin “ultrabook” equipped with Quad Core processor (can be equipped with a Xeon) and  NVIDIA Quadro GPU

ThinkPad P51s

Precision 5520 – This is one of the few precisions I would consider more prosumer than business class.  It’s a re-branded Dell XPS 15, the screen has almost no bezel and the laptop is the same size as many 14 inch laptops.  I don’t think it would hold up to make abuse because of how thin it is.  However, for a mostly stationary laptop it’s fantastic.  Can be equipped with Xeon E3.  Note that some of these models don’t ship with Intel Wireless cards which may cause problems.  Make sure it’s Intel.

Precision 5520

Dell XPS 15XPS 15 – Same thing as the above.  Note that some XPS models are not shipping with Intel Wireless cards which may cause connection problems.

 

 

Macbook Pro 15

Macbook Pro 15 – Great laptop, newer ones may have a touchbar which I find annoying but can be configured with a normal function key row.

Used / Refurbished options include the ThinkPad P5x series, older gen Dell XPS 15, Precision 5510.  This is a newer category so there won’t be as many older models here.

15.6 Inch Mobile Workstations

ThinkPad T570 – Great business laptop with a 15 inch screen.ThinkPad T570

ThinkPad P51 – Can be equipped with NVIDIA Quadro GPU, and Xeon E3.  Up to 64GB memory.

ThinkPad P51

Precision 7520

Precision 3520 – Can be equipped with Nvidia Quadro GPU, and Xeon E3.

Precision 3520

One thing to look out for is the keyboard layout, some 15 inch models have the keyboard offset to the left to make room for a numpad.  Some people would rather have the numpad and some would rather have a centered keyboard.

P51s Keyboard

Used / Reburbised Models are Precision 75xx, Precision 35xx, and Dell E65xx, ThinkPad P5x, ThinkPad T5xx, ThinkPad W5xx.

17.3 Inch Workstation

ThinkPad P71 – huge.

ThinkPad P71

Precision 7720 – huge.

Precision 7720

Used / Refurbished – Precision 77xx, P7x,  ThinkPad W7xx, Macbook Pro 17 inch.

Buying Used / Refurbished

There are some risks buying used.  USB firmware hacks, malware, etc.  However, it’s a great way to save money and some sellers provide a 1-year warranty.  Most businesses keep ThinkPads and Latitudes for 3-5 years then sell them so you can save a significant amount of money just staying 3 to 5 years behind.  Generally you want to buy the laptop from the guy that always kept it docked so it’s still in great condition.  Keep in mind that the reason businesses cycle through laptops is the productivity lost due to running slower and fixing failing components is greater than the cost of just buying a new laptop proactively.  Just something to keep in mind if you value your time.

It’s probably better to get a used / refurbished ThinkPad or Latitude than it is to buy a new consumer laptop. For newer refurbished items the Dell Outlet, Lenovo Outlet, and the Refurbished Mac store are good places to look.

One of the best places to pick up old refurbished ThinkPads may be WalMart’s website.   Also there are plenty of refurbished and used laptops on eBay and sometimes they can be found on Amazon as well.  If you are not comfortable installing an OS make sure it comes with a fresh install of Windows and the seller is highly rated and offer returns.  Many sellers also offer a warranty.

For used laptops the ThinkPad T, X, P, and W series will be a higher quality than the L and E.  Latitude 5000, 6000, and 7000 will be higher quality than the 3000 series.

To roughly find the age of a computer consider the current models for ThinkPad are T470, the middle 7 roughly means it’s a 2017 notebook.  Same for the Latitude 5480, the 8 means it’s roughly a 2017 year notebook (guess Latitude is +1 on the year).  So if you’re looking around on eBay know that a T440 or Latitude E5440 is roughly a 2013-2014 notebook.  The years don’t quite line up perfectly but gives you a general idea.  Another indicator to look at for age is the generation of Intel processor used (see CPU section below).

ThinkPad Computrace warning for used ThinkPads. Some ThinkPads have a Computrace feature which allows the owner to track down or remotely disable a laptop if lost or stolen.  If enabled only the owner (or one of the previous owners who enabled it) can turn it off.  You’ll want to make sure that is turned off before buying a used laptop or if you get one with it enabled ask the owner to turn it off and if they’re not able return it for a refund.  If you can’t track the previous owner you can call Computrace and they can attempt to contact the owner for you.

Things You Should Consider

Brand.  Dell vs Lenovo.  Dell Latitude has better support, service, and screens.  Lenovo laptops have better keyboards, build quality, and durability.  Both are pretty similar and both brands offer a comparable product in almost every size/model.

Docking Support.  Many laptops have the ability to dock into a “docking station”.  Dell and Lenovo have proprietary docking connectors and docks.  These are great solutions if you’re often working in an office or home.  At my house and office I have a docking station hooked up to dual monitors, ethernet, keyboard and mouse.  It’s convenient to dock in and have a full desktop experience (having multiple screens increases productivity) then undock when I’m on the go.  Not all laptops support docking, but if it’s something you’re interested in be sure to check for that capability.

Customer Support.  When issues occur I’ve found Dell to have the best support, usually after a 30 minute phone call they’ll have a technician scheduled to come out the next day.  Lenovo is 2nd, you’ll get the same result but usually a longer phone call.  In my experience when a Macbook breaks you’re going to be out of commission for a week or two while you send it off for repair.

Warranty.  Basic vs NBD (Next Business Day) Onsite.  Basic warranty usually means a part will get mailed to you, or you’ll ship your laptop and wait a few weeks for it to come back.  When buying new, you have the option to get a more advanced warranty.  If you are in situations where a broken computer can be costly then pay extra to get NBD onsite support.  A technician will meet you wherever you are, at your house, conference, etc. the next business day with a spare part if something needs to be replaced.  For road warriors who can’t have downtime this is a must.  On the other hand, if you aren’t traveling consider the cost of NBD vs just having an extra laptop on hand (perhaps your old laptop) you could use while your main one is under repair.

I generally purchase the cheapest warranty (1 year basic) because I have a spare and if my computer breaks early I’ll just buy a new one.  Over the long run I think this is cheaper.. but if I was a frequent traveler I’d probably opt for a 3 or 4 year NBD warranty.

Ultrabook vs Mobile Workstation.   Ultrabooks are designed to be as thin and light as possible, often because of the smaller size heat can’t be dissipated as quickly so the CPU can’t run at a sustained load for long periods of time without throttling, or a weaker CPU is used.  Most people won’t notice throttling and this is becoming less of an issue as CPUs become more efficient.  The other sacrifice ultrabooks make is shorter key travel so they don’t have a great typing experience, and fewer ports, slots, and extras like GPUs.  Sometimes components like RAM are soldered on and batteries may not be replaceable.

Mobile Workstations can usually be outfitted with more battery, more processing power, more key travel giving them a fantastic typing experience, and are generally easy to service  They tend to be heavier, but generally more durable and more likely to be found with more ports, not throttle under heavy load, can get them with a GPU, and often have trappable batteries.

Ways to save money.  So, in most cases there are several base configurations which can be customized.  I have found in general that Memory and Hard drives are more expensive upgraded through Dell or ThinkPad’s store.  Often it’s cheaper to buy a base configuration unit with the CPU you want and then buy your own memory and hard drive.  For most people swapping out the hard drive will be difficult because the OS will have to be reloaded so may not be worth it.  Sometimes memory is not replaceable so check the laptop your buying to see if it is.  Generally this is possible on the workstations and a hit and miss on the ultrabooks.   If buying a ThinkPad read the ThinkPad Introduction page which has links to Perks discounts.

Wireless Card.  Always get Intel.  If it’s not Intel branded, don’t buy the laptop.

Touchscreen.  I don’t like touchscren but some people do.  Usually both options are available.

Glossy or Matte Screen.  I much prefer Matte, I don’t want to see my own reflection in the screen.  Usually both options are available.

Screen Size and Quality.

Ono of the most popular screen sizes (and my favorite) is 14.4″, it allows for a full-size keyboard (without tenkey) and seems to me to be the right balance between portability and using it like a workstation (faster CPUs, optional GPUs, more key travel on the keys.  The ThinkPad T470 and Latitude 5480 are great workstations in this class, and the Latitude 7480 and ThinkPad X1 Carbon (which is lighter than a lot of 13.3 and 12.5 inch laptops) are great ultraboooks.

For frequent travelers going to 13.3″ or 12.5″ may be better.  If you need a bigger screen or a ten-key then a 15.6″ or 17″ is the way to go.

Dell is going to have better quality screens for brightness and color than Thinkpads in general.  I think 1920×1080 (FHD) screen resolution is pretty decent.  You may want to avoid higher resolutions than that like that because many applications can’t scale properly and become difficult to read.

Apple Laptops have a 16:10 aspect ratio instead of a 16:9.  16:9 is the aspect ratio that movies are in, but in most cases the 16:10 (extra vertical space) would be preferable.

Some newer laptops are coming out with aspect ratios with more vertical space such as 3:2 which is a good compromise between 4:3 and 16:9 but they haven’t made it to mainstream yet.

Keyboard.  The best keyboards will be on the ThinkPads, and the best of those will be on the Thinkpad T series, and the best one on the market today is the ThinkPad 25 but at a high cost premium.  If you use a computer to consume media this won’t matter.  If you’re going to be docked in most of the time it’s not a big deal since you’ll use an external keyboard.  If you type a lot on your laptop the ThinkPads will be better than Dells or Apples.

Keyboard Lighting: Most laptops have a backlit option, if you want it make sure it’s there.  Some older ThinkPads have a “ThinkLight” which is a light on the top of the screen that shines down on the keyboard.

CPU: Stick to the Intel Core i5 or i7 CPUs, whichever is cheapest.  For the most part there is very little difference between an i5 and i7, in smaller computers the i5 will perform as well or better than an i7 because it puts out less heat so doesn’t have to throttle as much.  AMD processors have been behind Intel in Laptops, would consider them 1 or 2 generations behind Intel although they have started to close the gap with the Rzyen processors they’re still a year behind Intel.  I would consider a newer AMD CPU if the price was right but for anything older than 7th gen AMD stick to Intel.

In general, since the i series most CPU generational changes are not that substantial, maybe adding 10-20% boost in performance between each generation so the need to buy a new computer often to get a faster CPU is not particularly great these days.  Most of the gains are around power consumption and battery life.  However, the 8th gen CPUs which should be widely available next year (2018) offer about a 30-40% improvement over 7th gen because of an increase in core count.  You can tell which generation you’re buying by looking at the first number after the “i5” or “i7”  E.g. a Core i5-7600 is a 7th Gen.  The Core i5-8600 is 8th Gen.

Memory: 8GB should be your absolute minimum.  I always get 16GB memory, but I try to buy a laptop with the smallest amount of memory possible and buy extra memory from Amazon.

Hard drive:  The single best thing you can do for computer performance is to get an SSD.  You do need to watch out for size.  NVMe SSDs tend to be faster.  Both will well outperform a normal hard drive.  SSDs are smaller so make sure you get an adequate size.  Minimum of 256GB for most people.  If you are my mother in law maybe a terabyte minimum.

Graphics Card / GPU: Most laptops are not great for gaming.  If you are buying a dedicated gaming laptop most of my recommendations are not ideal and you many want to look at other options.  But if you do play video games you should consider getting a laptop with an AMD or NVIDIA card in it, you’ll be better off than without it.  You’re not going to get the performance from a laptop that you would out of a desktop gaming computer, but you can get pretty far.   Having a GPU usually cuts into battery life but it’s not as bad as it used to be… most laptops can shutdown the discrete video card when not in use and use the built in Intel HD graphics on the CPU which is more battery friendly.  Another option is to get a laptop without a GPU, but use an eGPU enclosure and buy a desktop GPU to put in it… it will connect to your computer via Thunderbolt port.

Batteries.  There are usually a few options for batteries.  Many laptops don’t have removable batteries.  For laptops with removable batteries smaller ones tend to sit flush with the laptop.  Some laptops also offer larger battery packs (and even slices) that make the laptop bulkier but can provide more than 20 hours of battery life.

Some laptops can be adjusted to make the battery last longer by reducing the charge cycles.  E.g.  set your laptop to not start charging the battery until it drops below 80% instead of 95%, and having it charge to only 90% capacity may improve the longevity of the battery quite a bit at the cost of perhaps an hour of battery life of run-time.

DVD Drives.  It’s hard to find newer laptops with DVD drives, but some are available, especially if buying older used models.  Generally you can buy a blu-ray laptop drive and swap it out if you want to watch blu-way video.

Ports.  Consider what ports you will want on your laptop.  Is Ethernet important?  How many USB ports do you need?  What about USB-C?  What about a docking port?  If you present frequently maybe you want a laptop with a VGA port and an HDMI port?  What about SD Card readers?  Headphone jack?  Do you have to use a Smart Card to access certain systems?  In most cases I’ve found I use ports less frequently than I think I would–for me an SD Card reader, Ethernet and a couple USB ports is all I need.

Webcam, Microphone, and Speakers.  If you care about these things google the laptop model you’re looking at plus the word “review” and read a few reviews to see if you can get a sense of the microphone, webcam, and speaker quality.  Some laptops have the webcams placed at the bottom of the screen instead of the top which results in a weird angle when on using video calls.  Also, some laptops don’t have very good speakers so check reviews to see if they’re good, my Dell Latitude E5450’s speaker is so weak I can’t really hear the audio in movies 3 feet away unless there’s absolutely no other noise.

When do new laptop models get released?  It depends, I usually see new Latitudes and ThinkPads announced and released between January and April.  Often new models are announced at electronic shows.   But it depends on whether Intel and all the other suppliers are on schedule so things often get shifted around quite a bit.

Are there other good laptops than the ones you mentioned?  Yes there are.  There are other decent brands, some of the consumer laptops are fantastic.  I don’t know every possible laptop out there at every given moment.  This guide is meant to be more of a generic guide looking at good laptop lines over time, with the availability of NBD support if needed, and docking solutions across a wide range of options from workstations with GPUs to ultrabooks.  For the most part those come from ThinkPad and Dell, but that doesn’t mean a gem isn’t produced under other brands from time to time.

Hope that helps.

 

 

Ben’s Law | The Cost of Being Interrupted

Ben’s Law: within a 4 hour block of time, for each unit of uninterrupted time in hours (t), the value of productivity and creativity is roughly t^2.

An interruption resets t to zero.

Ben's Law: Cost of Interrupting Ben

p = t^2
c = t^2

if t = 1 (1 hour of uninterrupted time) then
p (productivity) = 1 and
c (creativity) = 1

if t = 2 then
p = 4 (4 times more productive then at t = 1) and
c = 4

and so on…

Now, I say roughly, because around the 4th hour–as it gets closer to lunch productivity starts to go down, the curve probably looks more like the below but p or c=t^2 is close enough.

Uninterrupted Development – Ideal 4 hour block of time

The below is very difficult to achieve.  This only happens to me once or twice a month, but when I get a 4 hour block of uninterrupted time I get more done during the last two hours of that block than I do in an entire week!

Writing programs is not at all like rote work, or any job where you’re following a procedure and can just pick up where you left off.  Development is more of a creative task, it requires time to ramp up, load what you’re trying to accomplish in your head.  You can’t always switch into creativity mode on demand and just start coding, you just find yourself one second staring at the code, and the next moment you’re unaware of your surroundings, you’re in the zone and the longer you can stay there the more you can accomplish.  I would say programming is more creative than most people think.  It’s more like painting, or writing a book, or composing music than it is engineering.  Interrupting a programmer is like interrupting a musician in the middle of a song.

Interrupted Development – Real World 4 hour block of time sliced to bits

This is more like the real world, and probably is a better indicator of most programmer’s 4 hour blocks of times.  You can get some work done this way, but it takes about a week to do what could be a day’s worth of work.  A quick interruption sometimes won’t cause enough damage to reset back to zero, but anything over a few minutes will do so.

 

Interrupted Time

See also:

http://www.paulgraham.com/makersschedule.html

This post is licensed under the CC BY 4.0 license.

Benchmarking Guest on FreeNAS ZFS, bhyve and ESXi

FreeNAS 11 introduces a GUI for FreeBSD’s bhyve hypervisor.  This is a potential replacement for the ESXi + FreeNAS All-in-One “hyper-converged storage” design.

Hardware

Hardware is based on my Supermicro Microserver Build

  • Xeon D-1518 (4 physical cores, 8 threads) @ 2.2GHz
  • 16GB DDR4 ECC memory
  • 4 x 2TB HGST RAID-Z, 100GB Intel DC S3700s for ZIL (over-provisioned at 8GB) on an M1015.  In Environments 1 and 2 this was passed to FreeNAS via VT-d.
  • 2 x Samsung FIT USBs for booting OS (either ESXi or FreeNAS)
  • 1 x extra DC S3700 used as ESXi storage for the FreeNAS VM to be installed on in environments 1 and 2 (not used in environment 3).

Environments

E1. ESXi + FreeNAS 11 All-in-one.

Setup per my FreeNAS on VMware Guide.  Ubuntu VM with Paravirtual is installed as an ESXi guest, on NFS storage backed by ZFS on FreeNAS which has raw access to disks running under the same ESXi hypervisor using virtual networking.  FreeNAS given 2 cores and 10GB memory.  Guest gets 1GB memory.  Guest tested with 1C and 2C.

E2. Nested bhyve + ESXi + FreeNAS 11 All-in-one.

Nested virtualization test.  Ubuntu VM with VirtIO is installed as a bhyve guest on FreeNAS which has raw access to disks running under the ESXi Hypervisor.  FreeNAS given 4 cores and 12GB memory.  Guest gets 1GB memory.  Guest tested with 1C and 2C.  What is neat about this environment is it could be used as a stepping stone if migrating from environment 1 to environment 3 or vice-versa (I actually tested migrating with success).

E3. bhyve + FreeNAS 11

Ubuntu VM with VirtIO is installed as a bhyve guest on FreeNAS on bare metal.  Guest gets 1GB memory.  Guest was backed with a ZVOL since that was the only option.  Tested wih 1C and 2C.

All environments used FreeNAS 11, E1 and E2 used VMware ESXi 6.5

Testing Notes

A reboot of the guest and FreeNAS was performed between each test so as to clear ZFS’s ARC (in memory read cache).  The sysbench test files were recreated at the start of each test.  The script I used for testing is https://github.com/ahnooie/meta-vps-bench with networking tests removed.

No attempts on tuning were made in any environment.  Just used the sensible defaults.

Disclaimer on comparing Apples to Oranges

This is not a business or enterprise level comparison.  This test is meant to show how an Ubuntu guest performs in various configurations on the same hardware with constraints of a typical budget home server running a free “hyperconverged” solution–a hypervisor and FreeNAS storage on the same physical box.  Not all environments are meant to perform identically…my goal is just to see if the environments perform “good enough” for home use.  An obvious example of this is environments using NFS backed storage are going to perform slower than environments with local storage… but it should still at the very least max out a 1Gbps ethernet.  This set of tests is designed to benchmark how I would setup each environment given the constraint of one physical box running both the hypervisor and FreeNAS + ZFS as the storage backend.  The test is limited to a single guest VM.  In the real world dozens, if not hundreds or even thousands of VMs are running simultaneously so advanced hypervisor features like memory deduplication are going to make a big difference.  This test made no attempt to benchmark such.  This is not an apples to apples test, so be careful what conclusions you derive from it.

CPU 1 and 2 threaded test

I’d say these are equivalent, which probably shows how little overhead there is from the hypervisor these days, though nested virtualization is a bit slower.

CPU 1 and 2 threaded

CPU 4 threaded test

Good to see that 2 cores actually performs faster than 1 core on a 4 threaded test.  Nothing to see here…

CPU 4 threads

Memory Operations Per Second

Horrible performance with nested, but with the hypervisor on bare metal ESXi and bhyve performed identically.

Memory OPS

Memory MB/s

Once again nested virtualization was slow.. other than that neck and neck performance.

Memory Test

OLTP Transactions Per Second

The ESXi environment clearly takes the lead over bhyve, especially as the number of  cores / threads started increasing.  This is interesting because ESXi outperforms despite an I/O penalty from using NFS so ESXi is more than making up for that somewhere else.

OLTP Test

Disk I/O Requests per Second

Clearly there’s an advantage to using local ZFS storage vs NFS.  I’m a bit disappointing in the nested virtualization performance since from a storage standpoint it should be equivalent to bare metal FreeNAS, but may be due to the slow memory performance in that environment.

Disk Ransom I/O

Disk Sequential Read/Write MBps

No surprises, ZFS local storage is going to outperform NFS

Disk Sequential I/O Well there you have it.  I think it’s safe to say that bhyve is a viable solution for home (although I would like to see more people using it in the wild before considering it robust–I imagine we’ll see more of that now that FreeNAS has a UI for it).  For low resource VMs E2 (nested virtualization)  is a way to migrate between E1 and E3–but it’s not going to work for high performance VMs because of the memory performance hit.

Treehouse

Eli picked this tree for his tree fort.

Tree

Draw up plans…

Attach a couple of 2 x 10s using 1/2 inch lag screws.

Eli using racket wrench to screw two by ten to tree

Install Hurricane Ties.

Eli installing Hurricane Tie on 2 by 10 that is attached to tree. On left is a 2 by 6 joist attached to a 2 by 10 using a Hurricane Tie.

Add 2x6s on top of the beams.  Eli wanted to drill in the screws so I turned the torque all the way down and let him have a shot at it… he is doing all he can to hold the drill!

Eli trying to use a drill ...he can't quite hold it up and position it correctlyI originally was going to pour concrete for the posts, but I found these concrete post blocks at home depot which was a lot easier than making sure they get below the frost line, and also makes the tree-house slightly more portable if I should ever need to move it.  Attached 4×4 posts to the outer joists (with two deck screws for now, but added 3/8 x 5.5″ bolts later).  Eli’s job was to make sure everything was level.

Framing of treefort. Beams, joists, and vertical posts attached at each corner.

2x6s for floor boards.  I left a gap between the tree and joists so it can grow a little without affecting the tree fort.

Floor boards are down, Eli on top of treefort. Drill and a box of screws. Eli wearing gloves.

Eli partway on ladder and treehouse surveying floor

Add walls…

Two walls have been added to the treeouse using 2 by 6es and 2 by 4s

Those 45° angles are perfect… Eli leveled them to 45.  We left an opening on two walls so there will be a few ways in and out.

Eli at a side entrace to the tree house, last wall built with an X pattern

Trap door

Trapdoor near trunk of tree

Inside the tree house-- tree trunk coming up in the middle.

One side..

Outside of tree-house showing completed wall

Another side… every side is a bit different.

Another angle outside of tree-house showing wall.

Discussing our plans for the two openings…

Eli in tree house

Add a climbing cargo net from Amazon…

Eli climbing treefort climbing cargo net

Used two screw ground anchors to hold the other end of the net to the ground.

Eli climbing cargo net up to treehouse

Added a 2×4 diagonal brace on each side.  Also notice the bucket connected to a rope and pulley on the right?

Added 2 by 4 diagonal braces

Ran out of color film…

Diagonal brace on back wall... Google turned the photo to black and white

Oh, something came today, we need one more 2×4…

Eli carrying 2 by 4

To support a slide!

Eli attaching two parts of slide with boltsSlide is attached to teehouse. Eli is going down slide.

Ben and Eli pose in treefort

Tree house floor plan showing slide and net

New Orleans Rapper Dee-1 Raps About Personal Finance

Despite being a millionaire Dee-1 still drives the same car, his old 1998 Honda Accord with 300,000 miles on it.

I don’t care for rap music, but this is interesting coming from the rap genre…

Dee-1 Raps About Not Having a Car Note and Paying Off Student Loans

Dee-1 singing in New Orleans
Photo by kowarski / CC BY 2.0

According to an interview by Clark Howard when Dee-1 landed his first record deal instead of using the cash advance to buy a new car or other things he wanted, he paid off his student loans.  Even though he wasn’t wealthy growing up he learned from his dad’s example the value of saving money.  During the interview he said that after college he had to make a distinction between his wants and needs.  He wanted to buy a new car when he got his first job as a teacher, but instead continued to drive his old car.

Now, despite being a millionaire Dee-1 still drives the same car, his old 1998 Honda Accord with 300,000 miles on it.

With educational loans being given to students like candy and the pressure to keep up with peers people are often finding themselves in tons of debt with no easy path out.

Dee-1 – Sallie Mae Back

It’s great to see a good example from a rapper.  He was responsible and lived a frugal lifestyle that enabled him to slowly work at his student loans.  Some might say it’s easy for him.   He got rich and was able to pay it all off faster.  But becoming wealthy is not what made him good at managing his money.  He was frugal and on a path to becoming debt free before his big break.  It has been shown over and over that people who haven’t learned to manage the money they have are even worse at managing more.

Dee-1 – No Car Note

When your friends, family, and neighbors are buying new cars, houses, and toys, don’t feel like you need to keep up and buy a bunch of stuff that’s as new and nice as they have.  You might do well enough keeping up with a millionaire rapper.